News & Events

  • One of the things I'm most proud of is directly connected to my experience in the MSS program at Dartmouth: I wrote a book!

    The book is Analyzing Multivariate Data (co-authored with Paul Green and J. Douglas Carroll).

    I wrote it after teaching a PhD course...

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  • My career has included the ongoing use of math and social sciences as combined disciplines. Whether quantitative analysis of federal programs as a staffer at the White House Office of Management and Budget or crunching numbers related to consumer buying patterns as part of private business consulting work that I did for a number of years, or more recently assessing effectiveness of different advertising and marketing programs for the boutique Virginia winery that I own, the concept of...

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  • My MSS degree has been invaluable my entire career. After programming computers for a few years I got an MBA and moved into finance. I did a stint as a CPA in public accounting and then became a CFO for several years. 10 years ago I completed an PhD in Business and now I have appointments at Geisel School of Medicine and the Tuck School of Business where I teach healthcare finance and am the Faculty Director of Dartmouth’s Masters in Healthcare Delivery Science (MHCDS) program. I also teach...

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  • Leading economics Ph.D. programs select their graduate students largely based on their aptitude in mathematics. My Math and Social Sciences honors major undoubtedly helped pull me out of the pack of applicants, allowing me to get into the Yale Ph.D. program (not to mention finish the program). (10/2014)

  • I earned a PhD in Statistics from Princeton. I then joined the Department of Social Statistics at Cornell in 1975, where I’ve taught since then. (For a coincidental link, the Department’s home is the School of Industrial and Labor Relations, which turned out to be the undergraduate school of Nick Mullins, who was my social science side advisor at Dartmouth—but I didn’t know that until I came here.) My career has included developing the statistics software, Data Desk, which is still...

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  • My whole career for the past 40 plus years has been built directly upon work that I started in my BA thesis in MSS at Dartmouth. I wrote about the application of computing and mathematical models to support decision making in rural New England towns. That was 1970. In 1977, I graduated from MIT’s Sloan school working in system dynamics and computer modeling (I had first encountered this field in a senior seminar at Dartmouth). I have been teaching simulation modeling to masters and PhD...

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  • My career has been as a city and regional planner, always specialized in the spatial distribution of activities and travel, which are amenable to quantitative analysis. With the expansion of computing hardware and software, such work has expanded to increasingly sophisticated simulations and visualizations. I worked for many years on Boston's Big Dig providing input to the traffic simulation model which guided its planning, design and construction. I am proud that the Greenway now adds value...

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  • Goal: Developing skills in graphical representation of quantitative data.

    Workshop Leaders

    Kosuke Imai, Princeton University

    Professor, Department of Politics
    Director, Program in Statistics and Machine Learning
    Executive Committee, Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science

    Jonathan Olmsted, Princeton University

    Senior Research and Computing Specialist, Department of Politics
    University of Rochester PhD (...

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  • Professor of Government Michael Herron's latest paper concludes that North Carolina's voting law changes are disadvantageous to black voters in the state.

    The draft study, coauthored with Daniel Smith, a University of Florida political science professor, comes as the national debate over restrictive election laws and voter ID requirements intensifies. Some 30 states have enacted ID provisions. Many of these new laws are being challenged in state...

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  • Researchers at Dartmouth and the University of Florida say recent voting law changes in North Carolina will disproportionately affect African-Americans, reports MSNBC.

    “We tried to figure out using publicly available voting data if the aspects we studied looked like they would have disproportionate effect on one racial group or whether they would be race neutral,” Michael Herron tells MSNBC. Herron is a professor of government and a co-author of...

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