News & Events

  • The Program in Quantitative Social Science is located on campus in Silsby Hall.  Originally built in the late 1920s, Silsby houses a number of social science units, QSS included.  The QSS space was remodeled during the summer of 2017, and the first QSS postdoctoral fellow to move in is Jun Zhao.  Jun received her doctorate in Sociology from University of Georgia, and her dissertation was titled The Role of Educational...

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  • I just started at The Oregonian for the summer as a data reporting intern. I’m still figuring out my exact project assignments, but the first few days I’ve been looking into government salary data and have felt very prepared thanks to the QSS program. I think the work overall might skew a bit more towards Python and my computer science background, but the ability to think critically about data and how it might answer and reveal certain questions has certainly been an advantage in journalism...

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  • The Program in Quantitative Social Science (QSS) seeks a postdoctoral research fellow for the 2018-2019 academic year. The fellow will work with Professor of Government Brendan Nyhan and be housed in and affiliated with QSS, an interdisciplinary program that integrates modern statistical, computational, and mathematical tools with social science questions. Applicants should have a proven record of research success; excellent writing and organizational skills; and expertise in experimental...

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  • The Program in Quantitative Social Science (QSS) at Dartmouth College is pleased to announce that it is searching for up to three postdoctoral fellows for the 2018-19 academic year. QSS is an interdisciplinary program that integrates modern statistical, computational, and mathematical tools with social science questions. Each fellow should be highly motivated, collegial, and able to work independently on a research agenda that is grounded in quantitative social science.

    During the...

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  • June 22-24, 2017 • Dartmouth College • Hanover, New Hampshire

    Affect control theory (ACT) examines how sentiment norms – our culturally shared meanings for particular types of actors, behaviors, emotions, and social settings – organize social life and direct us toward a mutual interpretive framework for interaction.  To find out more about this conference content and schedule, read here.

  • In a Letter to the Editor of The Dartmouth, Professor of Government and Latin American, Latino and Caribbean Studies and Cheheyl Director of the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning Lisa Baldez responds to a recent article entitled "Level Footing: The Professor-Student Dynamic."

    This article by Eliza Jane Schaeffer describes what empowers students—and what fosters learning: “building a relationship between students and professors, helping students engage with the...

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  • Clara Wang ’17, the first student to complete a minor in the Program in Quantitative Social Science, has been awarded a Fulbright scholarship.  Sponsored by the United States government, the Fulbright Program is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other nations through international educational exchanges in more than 155 countries. Fulbright awards are available for research, graduate study, and teaching English.  Clara Wang ’17...

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  •  I was attracted to Math and the Social Sciences because my first sociology course with Professor James Davis introduced me to the idea that the fuzzy issues of social behavior were amenable to quantitative analysis.

    The MSS major allowed me to explore that idea in depth. As unusual as it still seems, those concepts have served me very well in my subsequent career in academic neurosurgery.  Most of my colleagues in academic medicine at that time were steeped in the statistics of the...

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  • Let's say I hit the big red reset button on Humanity and everyone suddenly forgot their social identity, social status, and government.  What would happen on Day Two? It turns out, people have an amazing capacity for spinning up order out of nothing.  Pirates, prisoners, disaster survivors, gamers in virtual worlds, and theme park guests all give us real-world examples of the reset button in action.  Where does this order come from, how much can it be steered, and how much can it even be...

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