Recent Bulletins

QSS Hosts a Lecture by Andy Eggers, University of Oxford, "Who Votes Strategically?"
Posted on: 08/17/2016

Andy Egger's talk is in Rockefeller 209 on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, 4-5:30pm.

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Abstract: Strategic voting is an important explanation for aggregate political phenomena, yet we know little about how strategic voting behavior varies across groups in society. Are right-leaning voters more strategic than left-leaning voters? Are men more strategic than women? Does strategic voting behavior vary with education or income? Addressing these questions requires measuring and controlling for the incentive to cast a tactical vote, but previous measures are ad hoc, limited in application, or both. We introduce a general approach that yields a one-dimensional measure of a voter's incentive to vote tactically. Applying this measure to recent British elections, we show that the propensity to vote strategically was higher among voters on the left and among women but was not related to education or age.

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QSS Co-Sponsors Nate Cohn, The Upshot, NY Times, "Will Obama's America Vote for Trump?"
Posted on: 07/20/2016

The Program in Quantitative Social Science, as a co-sponsor with the Rockefeller Center and the Government Department, hosted campus guest, Nate Cohn, who is the political correspondent for the Upshot, a policy and politics site at the New York Times.

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Nate Cohn's talk "Will Obama's America Vote for Trump?" took place on Thursday, July 14th, in the Rockefeller Center.  For a recording of the talk, please see here.

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QSS Annual Workshop "Policing, Incarceration, and Politics," May 24-25, 2016
Posted on: 05/24/2016

The 2016 Annual Workshop of the Program in Quantitative Social Science is taking place on May 24-25th and is co-sponsored by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center.  The full schedule can be seen here.

16F New Course Offering: Evolutionary Game Theory and Applications, QSS 30.04
Posted on: 04/21/2016

The course introduces basic concepts in evolutionary game theory, including evolutionarily stable strategies, replicator dynamics, finite populations, and games on networks, along with applications to social evolution, particularly to understanding human cooperation.  Dist: SOC.

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Offered in Fall 2016 at the 10A hour with Professor Feng Fu. (draft course syllabus)

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16F Course Offering: US History Through Census Data, QSS 30.05
Posted on: 04/21/2016

This course focuses on using data from historical censuses (1850-2000) to examine U.S. history. We will discuss what the census tells us about the past, the role of the census in policy-making, and the history of the census. The course comprises four units: race, (im)migration, work, and family. For each, you will learn how to find, analyze, and visualize census data using R and how to write about quantitative historical analysis in a digital medium.   Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

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Offered in Fall 2016 at the 2A hour with Professor Emily Merchant.  Identical to History 90.01.  (course syllabus)

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QSS Hosts Jake Bowers, A Fellow with the White House Social and Behavioral Science Team
Posted on: 04/01/2016

The Program in Quantitative Social Science is hosting campus guest, Jake Bowers, who is a Fellow this year at the White House Social and Behavioral Science Team (SBST).  This is a cross-agency team of professionals with backgrounds in diverse fields including political science, economics, psychology, policy, law, medicine and statistics.  The team is unified by the commitment to use what research tells us about how people make decisions to better serve Americans and improve government efficiency.

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Students are cordially invited to come hear some about this unique team and ask questions on Monday, April 4th, 2016, at 3pm in Silsby 119. To find out more about the SBST, please see here:  https://sbst.gov/.

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17S QSS Course Offering: By the Numbers: Race, Incarceration and Politics, QSS 30.06
Posted on: 01/12/2016

More than half a century after the height of the Civil Rights Movement, inequalities between black Americans and white Americans persist.  Across a myriad of measures---including health, employment, income, wealth, education, and incarceration---black Americans are fundamentally different than whites. Leveraging contemporary data and modern quantitative techniques, we evaluate black-white racial gaps by the numbers and among other things consider how racial inequalities in the United States might alter the American political landscape. 

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Offered in Spring 2017 at the 10A hour with Professor David Cottrell. (course syllabus)

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16W New Course Offering: US History Through Census Data, QSS 30.05
Posted on: 12/08/2015

This course focuses on using data from historical censuses (1850-2000) to examine U.S. history. We will discuss what the census tells us about the past, the role of the census in policy-making, and the history of the census. The course comprises four units: race, (im)migration, work, and family. For each, you will learn how to find, analyze, and visualize census data using R and how to write about quantitative historical analysis in a digital medium.   Dist: SOC; WCult: W.

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Offered in Winter 2016 at the 10A hour with Professor Emily Merchant.  Identical to History 90.01.  (course syllabus)

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16W New Course Offering: Machine Readings--Text Analysis in the Information Age, QSS 30.02
Posted on: 10/15/2015

Library digitization has made millions of books, newspapers, and other printed materials accessible to the public. In this course we will learn how to draw on computational resources to analyze a range of materials, including poetry, novels, science fiction short stories, and personal diaries. We will explore debates about the representation of literary texts as "data" and consider the challenges "machine reading" poses for research in the humanities and how we think about what it means to "read" a text. Through case studies we will reflect critically on the history of the digital humanities (formerly known as humanities computing) and will gain practical experience in text analysis. Dist: LIT.

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Offered in Winter 2016 at the 12 hour with Professor Allen Riddell.  Identical to Math 5.01 and English 55.02. (course syllabus)

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Students Can Now Choose to Minor in Quantitative Social Science
Posted on: 09/16/2015

The QSS minor provides students with skills aimed at data analysis in the social sciences. The minor is grounded in computing and quantitative analytical techniques, and it empowers students to answer important empirical questions about the world.

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Core Skills:

The QSS minor is based on the notion that quantitatively- and computationally-oriented students interested in social science should be taught a core set of skills. Such students need to:

(1) know the basics of computer programming;

(2) have a foundation in calculus;

(3) know the basics of statistical inference;

(4) have exposure to mathematical modeling;

(5) be familiar with research design;

(6) have hands-on exposure to the difficulties and rewards of research.

QSS is the only program on campus that ties all of these subjects together. We welcome both social science students seeking additional technical training, and science and engineering students seeking exposure to social science techniques.

You may wish to take QSS courses earlier in your Dartmouth career as they will facilitate your ability to comprehend and engage in research.

Please see the minor webpage for more detailed information.

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